13 That same day Jesus went out of the house and sat beside the sea. 37 He answered, “The one who sowed the good seed is the Son of Man. II. Matthew 13:3 The Sower. 4 And as he sowed, some … You have been cast down to the earth, you who once laid low the nations! https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/geb/matthew-13.html. "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". 1905. For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath. Classes. Matthew 13:25 Lit tares. Will be given more. - Matthew only in this context, but found in the parallel passages shortly after the explanation of this parable - Mark 4:25; Luke 8:18. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/cal/matthew-13.html. Matthew 25:29, the fuller meaning of this saying, as applied not only to hearing, but to the whole spiritual life, is brought out by our Lord. When the Lord is banished from His day, the adversary takes possession of it, and makes it the period of heaviest drudgery to his slaves. Matthew 13:12 More and More or Less and Less. The same words he afterwards repeats, but in a different sense, (Matthew 25:29;) for on that occasion the discourse relates to the lawful use of gifts. But such as are incredulous, and resist my words, like the Pharisees and other Jews, so far from being enriched with the spiritual gifts in my kingdom, shall even be deprived of the benefits they now possess. Cantharus, et recubans sub eodem marmore Chiron; Jamque vetus Graecos servabat cista libellos. (See on Matthew 25:9). Only with the Spirit of God can we really understand the parables, but He has to give us the understanding. Knowing the explanation of this parable as explained in Matthew 13:36-43, we understand why Jesus said it right after explaining the parable of the sower, especially with the seed that grew up among the thorns. But he that hath not, from him shall be taken away even that which he hath. "The Adam Clarke Commentary". (See the note at Matthew 25:9.) Matthew 13 New King James Version (NKJV) The Parable of the Sower. How can that be? Matthew 13:30 Wheat in the Barn. Now what was this Nothing which, the poet said, Codrus had and lost? It means that a man who improves what light, grace, and opportunities he has, shall have them increased. "Whedon's Commentary on the Bible". Jesus says this is unpardonable and in turn rejects Israel. but whosoever hath not—who lets this go or lie unused, as a thing on which he sets no value. In Popish countries generally, and in some that are nominally Protestant, you may see the operation of the law in its threatening aspect. Those who do not value the higher uses of the Sabbath will fail to attain the lower. III. And great multitudes were gathered together to Him, so that He got into a boat and sat; and the whole multitude stood on the shore. Lectus erat Codro Procula minor, urceoli sex, Ornamentum abaci; necnon et parvulus infra. "John Wesley's Explanatory Notes on the Whole Bible". xxv., No. Matthew 13. Ver. He that hath the saving knowledge of the mysteries of the kingdom of God. Because it is given to you, &c; For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: from him shall be taken away even that which he hath. There is one example in Juvenal, Sat. But His present purpose in speaking them, as further explained below, was the quality possessed by them, and declared in the latter part of this verse, of hiding their meaning from the hard-hearted and sensual. 13 On that day Jesus left the house and was sitting by the sea. It contains a great truth, whether spoken or not on this occasion. "For whoever has, to him more shall be given, and he will have an abundance; but whoever does not have, even what he has shall be taken away from him. Living the Questions Questions have a way of marking important moments and events. But whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken away even that he hath. Those who have made some progress, will find still more. Proverbial saying derived from the experience of ordinary life (Matthew 25:29): The wealthy man will become still richer even to superabundance; while the poor man, again, will lose the little that still remains to him; see Wetstein. Jesus repeated this principle in the Parable of the Three Servants (Matthew 25:29). W. McGarvey and Philip Y. Pendleton. but whosoever hath not — who lets this go or lie unused, as a thing on which he sets no value. On the other hand, Christ declares that the reprobate are continually proceeding from bad to worse, till, at length exhausted, they waste away in their own poverty. He got into a boat and sat: Jesus sometimes used a boat as His “pulpit” (Mark 4:1). "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/hcc/matthew-13.html. First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages. Let us illustrate this doctrine by a reference: I. By them, he who hath not, in whom there is no spark of spiritual desire nor meetness to receive the engrafted word, has taken from him even that which he hath (“seemeth to have,” Luke); even the poor confused notions of heavenly doctrine which a sensual and careless life allow him, are further bewildered and darkened by this simple teaching, into the depths of which he cannot penetrate so far as even to ascertain that they exist. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/jfu/matthew-13.html. Consider, says our Lord, what you hear; and then, if they make due progress, he holds out the expectation of more plentiful grace: it shall be added to you that hear Lastly, follows the clause which agrees with the words of Matthew, but is inserted in the middle of a sentence which I expounded under the seventh chapter of Matthew; (185) for it is not probable that they are here placed in their proper order. from him shall be taken away even that he hath — or as it is in Luke (Luke 8:18), “what he seemeth to have,” or, thinketh he hath. Here, however, it is viewed as a divine ordination, as a judicial retribution in continual operation under the divine administration. to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance — He will be rewarded by an increase of what he so much prizes. Legg. Matthew 13:1 The same day went Jesus out of the house, and sat by the sea side. This use of the passive in a neuter sense belongs to late Greek. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/ice/matthew-13.html. iii. As a great ethical principle, we see it in operation everywhere, under the general law of habit; in virtue of which moral principles become stronger by exercise, while by disuse, or the exercise of their contraries, they wax weaker, and at length expire. Here, however, it is viewed as a divine ordination, as a judicial retribution in continual operation under the divine administration. John Trapp Complete Commentary. But though the preceding parable plainly leadeth to such a sense there, yet the preceding words seem as directly to lead to another sense here, and what is the more natural and proper signification of the word hath, which most naturally signifies to have a thing in our possession. 12 For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: but whosoever hath … And he that hath not, even that which he hath shall be taken from him. Whosoever hath. "Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges". College Press, Joplin, MO. Matthew’s story has from the beginning drawn us in with the good news announcement of salvation that is to be for us in this one who as “Immanuel — God with us” will “save his people … Continue reading "Commentary on Matthew 16:13-20" "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". So those who devote not the light and power which God has given them to the purposes for which he has granted these gifts, from them shall be taken away these unemployed or prostituted blessings. (Psalms 138:8.). The phrase: from him shall be taken away that which he hath, points to a seeming or supposed knowledge. No practical comment on the latter part of this saying can be more striking, than that which is furnished to our day by the study of the German rationalistic (and, I may add, some of our English harmonistic) Commentators; while at the same time we may rejoice to see the approximate fulfilment of the former in such commentaries as those of Olshausen, Neander, Stier, and Trench. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tsk/matthew-13.html. By it, he who hath,—he who not only hears with the ear, but understands with the heart, has more given to him; and it is for this main purpose undoubtedly that the Lord spoke parables: to be to His Church revelations of the truth and mysteries of His Kingdom. According to Matthew. There is a more general and confused knowledge of a thing; and there is a more distinct, clear, particular knowledge. Matthew 13:22 Context. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain. All Rightes Reserved, Larry Pierce, Winterbourne, Ontario.A printed copy of this work can be ordered from: The Baptist Standard Bearer, 1 Iron Oaks Dr, Paris, AR, 72855. Matthew 13:3 And he spake many things unto them in parables, saying, Behold, a sower went forth to sow; Matthew 13:4 And when he sowed, some … We read again, (Matthew xxv. The evil spirits hovering round press like air upon the privilege; the moment they find the room empty they rush in. “Beware,” he says, “lest what has been given be taken away from you, if it yield no fruit.”. Whoever uses his opportunities will grow; whoever abuses them will lose them. Abuse of privileges justly produces their withdrawment. The weeds are the people of the evil one, 39 … "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". ; Fausset, A. R.; Brown, David. Take heed therefore how ye hear: for whosoever hath, to him shall be given; and whosoever hath not, from him shall be taken even that which he seemeth to have. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website.Original work done by Ernie Stefanik. Thus the Jews were deprived of their temple, priesthood, kingdom, and even the true worship of God. Why Parables? The Expositor's Greek Testament. Matthew 13:31–32—Did Jesus make a mistake when referring to the mustard seed as the smallest of all seeds? If from want of taste for it we abandon spiritual communion with the Lord on His own day, the material benefit of bodily rest will slip from our hands. See Ex 12:15 for the first mention of leaven in the Old Testament. Albeit hypocrites are commonly detected even in this life: how else should their names rot, as every wicked man’s must? For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: by him that hath, some understand, he that hath and maketh use of what he hath, and that is plainly the sense of it Matthew 25:29, where it is the epiparabola, or conclusion of the parable about the talents. Justin Edwards' Family Bible New Testament, Cambridge Greek Testament for Schools and Colleges, Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament. And the whole Gospel is a parable to him whose heart has not the key. "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". The Parable of the Sower Explained 18 “You, then, listen to the parable of the sower: # Mk 4:13-20; Lk 8:11-15 19 When anyone hears the word # Gk logos = word, or message, or saying, or thing about the kingdom and doesn’t understand it, the evil one comes and snatches away what was sown in his heart. The same saying is found in Matthew 25:29 (the talents) and Luke 19:26 (the pounds). Hence, also let us learn to aim at progress throughout our whole life; for God grants to us the taste of his heavenly doctrine on the express condition, that we feed on it abundantly from day to day, till we come to be fully satiated with it. "Peter Pett's Commentary on the Bible ". "Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/pet/matthew-13.html. Matthew 13 English Standard Version (ESV) The Parable of the Sower. Greek Testament Critical Exegetical Commentary. Matthew Poole's English Annotations on the Holy Bible. To you my Father hath given eternal life, and, as means in order to it, to know more clearly, particularly, and distinctly the things that concern the kingdom of God; to know and to believe in me, who am the Saviour of the world: my Father hath no such special and particular kindness for the generality of this people, and therefore he hath not given to them the same aids and assistance. Superior knowledge was given to the disciples of Christ: they improved it, however slowly, and the promise was that it should be greatly increased. Certain keys unlock parables, and if we do not have the keys, we will miss the … "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". Copyright StatementThese files are public domain.Text Courtesy of BibleSupport.com. Matthew 14 BibliographyTrapp, John. BibliographyJamieson, Robert, D.D. Because it is given to you, &c; For whosoever hath, to him shall be given, and he shall have more abundance: from him shall be taken away even that which he hath. 1896. His disciples came to him and said, “Explain to us the parable of the weeds in the field.”. Some here distinguish concerning the things which concern the kingdom of God. "People's New Testament". The Parable of the Sower. All other rights reserved. THE CONTEXT Chapters 23-25 are Jesus' final discourse (lengthy speech or teaching) in this Gospel. Matthew 13:12. his moral apothegm is here given only in Matt. The same principle reigns in the intellectual world, and even in the animal—if not in the vegetable also—as the facts of physiology sufficiently prove. "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". This seems to have been a proverbial mode of speech, which our Lord here uses to inform his disciples, that he who does not improve the first operations of grace, howsoever small, is in danger of losing not only all the possible product, but even the principal; for God delights to heap benefits on those who properly improve them. Matthew 13:3 A short story that illustrates a moral or religious principle. Johann Albrecht Bengel's Gnomon of the New Testament. BibliographyBengel, Johann Albrecht. And why? BibliographyHaydock, George Leo. BibliographyAlford, Henry. Ver. BibliographyWhedon, Daniel. The faithless Jew was sinking down to the level of a superstitious heathen. Those who do not have a great desire to please God (Matthew 5:6), will lose their ability to respond to God. BibliographyBurkitt, William. Matthew 13:7,22: Sown Among Thorns. In this instance the saying is used with reference to spiritual possessions, and is applied thus: With the knowledge you have already acquired, you are ever penetrating more deeply and fully into the things of God’s kingdom; the multitude, on the other hand, would lose altogether the little capacity it has for understanding divine truth, unless I were to assist its weak powers of apprehension by parabolic illustrations. For. 36 Then he left the crowd and went into the house. To him that hath the seed of God in him as in good ground. Matthew 13:12—Is God unfair in giving to those who have? 2. A rule of God’s dealings with men, holding good even in the lower forms of creation; here to be applied to knowledge of spiritual things. There is a mere notional knowledge, and there is a more effective, experimental knowledge. 13 You said in your heart, "I will ascend to the heavens; I will raise my throne above the stars of God; I will sit enthroned on the mount of assembly, on the utmost heights of Mount Zaphon. "Coffman Commentaries on the Old and New Testament". For whosoever hath, to him shall be given] sc. Matthew 13:12. (605)— ὅστις οὐκ ἔχει, whosoever hath not) The conjunction ὅτι (because), in Matthew 13:13, refers to this, and μήποτε (lest at any time), in Matthew 13:15, to ἀρθήσεται (shall be taken away).— καὶ ὃ ἔχει, even that which he hath) shall be taken away.— ἀρθήσεται, shall be taken away) Even though he hear, yet he shall not hear; and that which he hath heard shall at length (undoubtedly after the judgment) be so taken away from him, that he shall be as if he had never heard anything. "Calvin's Commentary on the Bible". So it is with today’s lesson. This may appear to be a harsh expression; but instead of saying, that what the ungodly have not is taken from them, Luke softens the harshness and removes the ambiguity by a slight change of the words: and whosoever hath not, even that which he thinketh that he hath shall be taken from him. In the medley of sounds which constitutes the hum of Paris on the Lord's Day, a Christian distinguishes with sadness the clatter of the mechanic's tool. It was either withheld, or wrapped in unexpressed enigmas. The manner in which Mark introduces this sentence has some appearance of confusion. For the construction, vide at Matthew 10:14.— περισσευθήσεται: again in Matthew 25:29, where the saying is repeated. James 1:7. Copyright StatementThese files are public domain and are a derivative of an electronic edition that is available on the Christian Classics Ethereal Library Website. Certain keys unlock parables, and if we do not have the keys, we will miss the … To nations. Something like that law, our Lord tells His disciples, is to be found in the conditions of spiritual growth in wisdom. The five preceding lines tell you. The laws of his kingdom, they say, are delivered plainly viz. 1891. A sower went out to sow.+ 4 As he was sowing, some seeds fell alongside the road, and the birds came … But whosoever hath not (who lets this go or lie unused, as a thing on which he sets no value) from him shall be taken away even that he hath - or as it is in Luke (Luke 8:18), "what he seemeth to have" [ ho (Greek #3588) dokei (Greek #1380) echein (Greek #2192)], or 'thinketh he hath.' "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". Follow Desiring God on Facebook. 1700-1703. God manifested in the flesh is the great mystery of the gospel, the mystery hid from ages, yet I am sure the knowledge of Christ as such is necessary to salvation. (Bruner) But whosoever hath not, hath not the seed of God, a true root of grace, in whom the seed of my word hath not fallen as in good ground, but only as in the highway, or in thorny or stony ground. Biblical Commentary (Bible study) Matthew 5:1-12 EXEGESIS: MATTHEW 5-7. E.M. Zerr's Commentary on Selected Books of the New Testament. Whosoever hath not. BibliographyGill, John. And as his riches are inexhaustible, (184) so he is never wearied with enriching his children. From those who have not kept the Sabbath holy the weekly rest has been taken away. But whosoever hath not: the truth of grace, nor a spiritual knowledge of Christ, nor any experience of the doctrines of the Gospel. BibliographyWesley, John. The Parable of the Weeds Explained. The damned shall be tortured with ignorance, and the thirst for knowledge. "Schaff's Popular Commentary on the New Testament". 2 And such large crowds gathered to him that he went aboard a boat and sat down, and all the crowd was standing on the beach.+ 3 Then he told them many things by illustrations,+ saying: “Look! First published online in 1996 at The Restoration Movement Pages. Learn, That where there are beginnings of true grace, and a right and wise improvement of it, God will make rich additions or more grace to the present stock which we have received. 1999. This is the key to all his providential dispensations; as will appear to men and angels in that day. "Commentary on Matthew 13:12". The Saviour here lays down a general principle of deep and solemn import, which all who hope to be saved would do well to ponder in their hearts. He begins Jesus' ministry with the Sermon on the Mount (chapters 5-7), the first of five major teaching sections (see also 10:5 – 11:1; 13:1-53; 18:1 – 19:1; 24:3 – 26:1). Matthew 13:55, 56 The Carpenter's Son and His Relations. 1859. whosoever. 38. Matthew 13:10-17. https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/bcc/matthew-13.html. Romans 13:12 Further Study. Matthew 13:12, ESV: "For to the one who has, more will be given, and he will have an abundance, but from the one who has not, even what he has will be taken away." But at least they will not be ‘Gospel-hardened’. that he is one that hath, and becomes day by day more sure of perseverance.— περισσευθήσεται, he shall be rendered more abundant(604)) and shall surpass his former self. Figure of speech Synecdoche (of Genus). Matthew 25:29. 1983-1999. 1685. 1488. BibliographyEdwards, Justin. The Jews had many opportunities of learning the truth, and some light still lingered among them; but they were gross and sensual, and misimproved them, and it was a just judgment that they should be deprived of them. They had some elements of that wisdom, and therefore, using their knowledge rightly, could pass on to more. Heinrich Meyer's Critical and Exegetical Commentary on the New Testament. The multitudes had been given the words of Moses and the prophets, yet they refused to see in them the beauties of the kingdom of heaven in predicted form. Whosoever hath — That is, hath a willing and receptive disposition and purpose. Answer: It must not be understood of things in the same nature and kind; Luke expounds it, Matthew 8:18, by o dokei ecein, that which either to himself or to others he seemeth to have. In 1 Corinthians 11:22, τους μη εχοντας, those who have not, means simply The Poor: and Aristophanes uses τους εχοντας, those that have, for the Rich or Opulent. "The Treasury of Scripture Knowledge". https:https://www.studylight.org/commentaries/tfg/matthew-13.html. As a great ethical principle, we see it in operation everywhere, under the general law of habit; in virtue of which moral principles become stronger by exercise, while by disuse, or the exercise of their contraries, they wax weaker, and at length expire. The multiplied favors which are continually flowing from him to us, and the joyful progress which we make, spring from God’s contemplation of his own liberality, which prompts him to an uninterrupted course of bounty.
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